UMUC Cyber Experts Predict Battle-Tested Attacks, a Focus on Election Security

As it was when 2018 began, cybersecurity remains a top global priority at year’s end and, arguably, even more so. We simply need to look back over the past year to see that data breaches have affected just about every aspect of our lives.

What can we expect 2019 to bring? Cybersecurity faculty experts at the University of Maryland University College (UMUC) offer five unique industry predictions, trends and priorities for the coming year.Continue Reading

UMUC Honors Faculty Worldwide for Teaching Excellence

University of Maryland University College (UMUC) conferred its highest faculty teaching honor, the Stanley J. Drazek Teaching Excellence Award, on eight of its most outstanding faculty members in the U.S., Europe and Asia and recognized more than a dozen others for their noteworthy contributions to the scholarship and art of teaching at UMUC’s Annual Global Faculty Awards celebration Dec. 3 through 7.Continue Reading

Students Say Schools Must Do More to Create a Clearer Pathway to a Cybersecurity Career

For high school students, deciphering the route to a future career in cybersecurity takes ingenuity, perseverance and creativity, said student speakers at the Nov. 8 symposium “Attacking the Roots of Cyber (In) Security: The Role of Education,” organized by Cyber Center for Education & Innovation (CCEI)–Home of the National Cryptologic Museum (NCM) and hosted by University of Maryland University College (UMUC).

It’s commonly understood that hundreds of thousands of jobs in cybersecurity are going begging now, and projections call for continued rapid growth in the future.  But participants on the panel, “Building the STEM Pipeline: The Student Perspective,” told conferencegoers that barriers still remain in public education that discourage students from going into the field.Continue Reading

Music and Civil Rights Activism Unite Artists Floyd Coleman and Hayward Oubré

Floyd Coleman’s dad kept quiet about his son’s whereabouts when two Ku Klux Klan members showed up at his Alabama home in 1960. Coleman, then an Alabama State University student, and his roommate were inspired by the Greensboro, North Carolina, sit-ins and decided to organize their own Jim Crow protests at the university. After the Klansmen left, Coleman’s father phoned him at school.

“Don’t stop your activism. Don’t stop the sit-ins,” Coleman’s father told him. “But don’t come home.”Continue Reading